Ending Your Lifelong Weight Struggle

Today I wanted to talk to something near and dear to my heart, and that is ending your lifelong weight struggle.

According to Bray, George A et al, “Overweight and obesity are worldwide problems that affect >100 million Americans or 68.5% of the adult population.”*

Obesity has been called an “epidemic,” and studies from Harvard report that there have been $190 billion spent on obesity-related illnesses and the treatment of obesity itself, but there remains to be a single, defined cure for everyone.

So what do we do?

Even if a cure-all drug or diet were released, the challenge of offering a blanket recommendation to the world is that every human is different, and what works amazingly well for one person may work terribly for someone else.

If you are like most people who have struggled with your weight for your whole life, or even a decade or two, you are likely frustrated. You may feel like these statistics support your conundrum, and you may want to blame fast food chains, availability of highly palatable foods, your metabolism, your mother, you name it.

I get it– I wanted to blame people, too! I didn’t want to think it was my fault for creating a body that felt foreign to me– I just felt like I was trying to cope with this life and this body just happened.

The truth is, we can blame a lot of people and some intense life circumstances for wherever we are, but that only serves to keep us stuck.

In order to make progress, we have to desire the freedom in transformation more than we find comfort in the story keeping us chained.

Jack Canfield’s first of his Success Principles (in the book with the same title) is to “take 100% responsibility for your life.”

So, what if we just decided that …

  • We no longer focus on who or what to blame!
  • We figure out the solution for ourselves starting now!
  • The solution is actually finding the cure for ourselves, and not waiting for someone else!
  • We are willing to take 100% responsibility in this area of life!

When I asked myself these question on my own weight loss journey it really broke my brain because it made me realize that I actually have all the answers that I need– I just needed to start testing, have some patience, and create a format for myself that would confirm I was on the right track.

This is why I am beyond excited for my Holiday Fat Loss Challenge October 26th-30th.

In these 5 days, I am going to training you specifically on how to create a plan for YOU that gets results.

Whether you’ve been struggling with your weight your whole life, a decade or two, or have noticed that since you hit 40 you keep gaining weight, I can assure you there is a solution… and it’s not what you think.

If you’d like to join the challenge, then go to my website and sign up for your free guide: How to Stop Overeating When Working From Home, and I’ll let you know as soon as the challenge opens up.

ACTION FOR TODAY: For those of you who don’t know, I am a big fan of accountability. If you are ready to start your journey today, then download the My Fitness Pal app and start tracking your food. You don’t have to hit any goals or targets, just start noticing what you’re eating. Awareness is the first step, so if you are ready to make some progress, then click here to get started.

*Bray, George A et al. β€œThe Science of Obesity Management: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement.” Endocrine reviews vol. 39,2 (2018): 79-132. doi:10.1210/er.2017-00253

Why Am I Quaranteating and How Do I Stop?

Quarantineating?

Let’s be honest, the Quarantine Fifteen is becoming a real thing, and if you are like most people, you may have had more than one day over the past 6 months where you’ve found yourself plowing through snacks like a maniac.

No judgement.

But if you’ve found yourself in a place where you are realizing that living in your Lulu’s has led you to outgrow your work pants, then I want to share with you some insights that may help you better understand what is really going on.

But first, some woo…

Our throat chakra is the center of communication.

It’s where we speak, we feed ourselves, and express our desires.

In a usual situation if we dislike something we use our voice to acknowledge it, to meet our needs.

But right now that voice may be making requests for needs (for things like getting back to normal life, desiring clean air, walking freely without a mask, traveling wherever you want to go), but due to our current circumstances, the requests are not creating freedom.

We may be voicing our needs audibly or internally, but it’s like the universe is saying, I hear you and no.

When those beautiful words are not allowed to get out in a way that provides relief we are seeking, the emotions we experience get repressed; they go inward and start looking for an outlet within the body.

Welcome, discomfort!

We all know that a quick resolution for discomfort is eating– particularly eating highly palatable foods that taste really good.

When we eat, we dull out the vibration of emotions because our body switches focus from feeling emotions to gaining pleasure from food.

Essentially, we’ve given our body a new job: disregard emotions– focus on eating.

While eating may feel pleasurable momentarily, it does not resolve the fact that we are still silenced, so what happens?

More eating. We then train ourselves to follow the dopamine hit we get from eating rather than feeling the discomfort of energy running through our bodies.

So what do we do???

  1. Pause & Breathe: Take a deep breath- nothing has gone wrong. Your body is simply responding to a stimulus it wasn’t prepared for.
  2. Feel: In your pause you will notice that there may be something else going on– there might be some kind of static, gnawing or discomfort that you want to escape from– if you are super uncomfortable then you are right on track.
  3. Explain: Take some time in your feeling to explain to yourself what is happening. Do you have tightness in your chest or neck? Is there a pulsing or a fluttering?
  4. Identify: If this motion in your body were a feeling, what would it be? If you have a hard time identifying emotions and feelings, then use a tool like this wheel below to start identifying what that motion feels like.

Once you’ve identified your feeling, I want you to notice it, and continue to explain it to yourself, and watch the urgency behind the feeling dissolve.

I also want to assure you that it’s acceptable to feel uncomfortable feelings.

The human experience is truly 50% positive emotions and 50% negative emotions.

Feeling negative emotions or uncomfortable feelings doesn’t mean anything has gone wrong. You just have to decide how you want to show up when those feelings surface.

You may not be able to control circumstances, but you can control how you show up for them.

So the next time you notice that you are showing up for an eating event that is not aligned with your goals– mindless snacking in the pantry or eating a whole meal of whipped cream from a can while standing in front of the fridge— take the pause, and go through the steps above.

Secrets of the Top 5% of People Who Lose Weight For Good!

We’ve all heard the statistics about how 95% of people regain weight they lose. As many of you know, I dropped over 70 pounds nearly 2 decades ago, and when I first started coaching one of my greatest visions was to create a sustainable weight loss program for people that would help them keep the weight off for good.

While I did my own due diligence about how to create dietary protocols through personal training, nutrition and coaching certifications, I also got really curious about the other 5% of people like me who had sustained a weight loss of over 30 pounds and kept it off for over 5 years. What were they doing that helped them keep their pounds off?

The following data is according to the National Weight Control Registry Study of Successful Weight Losers (and of course I’ve added my own two cents for your entertainment– you’re welcome πŸ˜‰ ):

So here you have it..

They exercise (shocker, I know)! While I don’t believe you need to be an athlete to lose weight, I can tell you that working out is something that has built my confidence (and many friendships) over the years. The group reported 200 minutes a week, which may sound like a lot, but note that this is what they do to maintain their weight. We also don’t know if this is walking, running, gardening, weight lifting, or power yoga, but we know they exercise. Start with 5 minutes of walking a week and then add a minute each week. Starting small is key. Rome wasn’t built in a day, people.

They limit television watching to less than 10 hours a week. I’ll admit, when COVID hit, this went out the window for me. And for the days I don’t watch TV, I know I watch a hell of a lot of YouTube videos, so this is a rule I break. Also, with all the tvs on cardio equipment these days, I wouldn’t call this rule essential unless you’re not working out and eating healthy, yet you can’t seem to “find time” to do those things, yet you have tons of time to binge-watch Netflix #reconsiderpriorities .

They monitor their intake. The group reported eating an average of 1380 calories a day with less than 30% coming from fat. Whether you count calories or use the hunger scale, people who have success do so because they have some kind of monitor. I’d suggest starting with a tracking app such as My Fitness pal. Also 1,380 is a relative number based on the metabolism of the reporters, so I’d actually recommend calculating your TDEE (total daily energy expenditure) first, which you can do by clicking here. Eat at your predicted maintenance calories for a couple weeks to establish a baseline. If you want to lose weight, you will have to eat less, exercise more, or a little of both. If you need help with this, just DM me.

They eat a consistent diet and similar foods (you know you’re doing this when your grocery list pretty much looks the same from week to week). This doesn’t mean that you can’t have something different, but that you likely have some healthy staples you consistently purchase. I’ve been eating a chicken salad mostly every day for lunch for the last 2 decades and that doesn’t mean that some days I don’t have a steak salad or a chicken wrap, but for simplicity sake, I keep it consistent.

They eat breakfast.

If you don’t follow me on Instagram, then you may not know this, but I have a bit of a waffle addiction πŸ™‚

High dietary restraint. They do not overeat to accommodate internal (emotions) or external cues (availability of food). This is definitely one that sounds easy to master, but it’s where I spend 90% of time with clients. I just put out a new workbook on habits to implement if this is a struggle for you, which you can find here.

Self monitoring. They weigh themselves at least once per week and daily track their food intake. I like to take this a step further and weigh myself and measure my waist daily, and take weekly progress photos. I also track and weigh my food.

So there it is! Now that you have the secrets, all you have to do is get started. I find one thing at a time works best. If you don’t exercise now, just start with 5 minutes a day. If you haven’t weighed yourself in a decade, get a new scale. If you don’t monitor your food, start with one meal a day. Change is possible my friends, and if you commit to making one change a month, then in 6 months you could be on your own path to weight loss success.

I am going to be doing an email series on all of these items separately over the next couple weeks, so if you don’t want to miss out, then you can get my free guide: How to Stop Overeating When Working from Home and get on my email list so you don’t miss out.